Cybersecurity in Context

Every one now has a stake in the healthy functioning of communications and control networks, in the devices and services dependent on network, and by implication, in all the complicated infrastructure required to keep networks, devices, and services operating. As we have become more affluent and as the economy has become more interconnected, we are interdependent in ways never thought possible.

The proper functioning of communications networks, which carry everything from banal social updates to the second-by-second valuations of companies to the intelligence that shapes governments’ posture in conflicts, is now a central problem. But it is also an insoluble problem. Cybersecurity is a wicked problem. Cybersecurity is an unbounded problem that cannot be cleanly extricated from an array of social problems and interests. In managing cybersecurity there are few unqualified good approaches, but rather a series of contests and choices among important values. Cybersecurity will also never be solved definitively; instead concerns about whether we can trust devices, networks, and the information present in them will persist and need to be managed.

This is a textbook project with LSU Computer Science Professor Golden Richard III. We explain how cybersecurity has come to encompass these complex interests, how cybersecurity is conceptualized, and how cybersecurity concerns and rules are diffusing through the public and private sectors. Our textbook will introduce students to the technology, political dynamics, theory, and legal practice of cybersecurity.

Representative publications: